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The Hollywood Reporter: Actor Roundtable

Six contenders — also including Mahershala Ali, Andrew Garfield, Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Dev Patel — on what it takes to play a real-life person, making a drug dealer likable, turning down parts and the agony of acting: “The very thing you love is the thing you hate.”


Halfway through this year’s Actor Roundtable, just as THR’s group was settling in with one another, Casey Affleck paused to look at Jeff Bridges with something bordering on awe. “Jeff,” he said, “not to draw attention to your age or anything, but I just want to point out that when I was born in 1975, you had already worked with Peter Bogdanovich, John Huston and Robert Benton.”
“Yeah,” Bridges shrugged.

“So you were bushed before I was born, man,” said Affleck.

That gives some idea of the warmth that flowed among the group, one of THR’s younger-skewing actor gatherings, with Bridges, 67 (Hell or High Water), playing patriarch to Affleck, 41 (Manchester by the Sea); Mahershala Ali, 42 (Moonlight); Andrew Garfield, 33 (Hacksaw Ridge, Silence); Joseph Gordon-Levitt, 35 (Snowden); and Dev Patel, 26 (Lion).

Many confessed to being nervous, especially beside the elder statesman. But Bridges surprised them at the Nov. 12 shoot in Hollywood by admitting he was jittery, too ­— and that after all these years, he still feels fear when he takes on a role.

What do you most like about acting and what do you like the least?

Andrew Garfield: I just like knowing everything I can. I love the fact that I get to train for a year as a Jesuit priest and then train to be a cop and learn how to make a rocking chair. I want to know everything about everything, and that’s not possible and it won’t be possible. I’m not ever going to reach it. Neil Young has a recurring dream where he has the perfect melody — and he wakes up every time and can’t remember it. And that’s what it is for me. There’s something to aspire to always, there’s somewhere further to go. And the thing that I hate about acting is — well, everything I just said. (Laughter.) The longing is so f—ing painful sometimes.

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Actors on Actors: Andrew Garfield and Amy Adams

Andrew Garfield and Amy Adams chatted during a taping of Variety‘s “Actors on Actors” on a range of topics, including their portrayals of comic-book icons. For more, tune in when the fifth season premieres on PBS SoCal, presented by The Venetian Las Vegas, on January 3.


Categories Articles Interviews Movie Projects Press Silence

New York Times Magazine Interview

Silence is a novel about “the necessity of belief fighting the voice of experience,” as Scorsese has put it. To get the Jesuits’ beliefs right, he engaged the Rev. James Martin, an author and editor at large of the Jesuit weekly America. Filmmaker and priest had several colloquies at Scorsese’s home, and Martin worked intensively with Garfield and Driver. Just as De Niro learned to box for “Raging Bull,” they familiarized themselves with the rites and disciplines of the Jesuit priesthood to bring authenticity to their performances.

Garfield, known for his role in two “Spider-Man” movies, prepared to play Father Rodrigues by entering fully into the process that Jesuits call “spiritual direction.” Raised outside London, with a secular Jewish father, Garfield developed his character by undergoing the “Spiritual Exercises” of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit order. The exercises, devised in the 1520s, invite the “exercitant” to use his imagination to place himself in the company of Jesus, at the foot of the cross, among tormented souls in hell. Garfield met with Martin for spiritual direction, and they swapped reflections via email and Skype. Then he set out for St. Beuno’s, a Jesuit house in Wales, to undertake a seven-day silent retreat.

“If I’d had 10 years, it wouldn’t have been enough to prepare for this role,” Garfield told me. “I got totally swept up in all things Jesuit and very taken with Jesuit spirituality. The preparation went on for nearly a year, and by the time we got to Taiwan, it was bursting out of me.”

It’s not unusual for performers to allude vaguely to their spirituality. But Garfield describes the process with guileless specificity. “On retreat, you enter into your imagination to accompany Jesus through his life from his conception to his crucifixion and resurrection. You are walking, talking, praying with Jesus, suffering with him. And it’s devastating to see someone who has been your friend, whom you love, be so brutalized.” Before Garfield left for Taiwan, Martin gave him a cross he had received as a gift while a Jesuit novice.

“Andrew got to the point where he could out-Jesuit a Jesuit,” Martin told me. “There were places in the script where he would stop and say, ‘A Jesuit wouldn’t say that,’ and we would come up with something else.”

“I don’t think I am called to be a priest,” Garfield said to me resolutely, as if making this film had spurred him to consider the prospect. “But I had the feeling that I was being called to something: called to work with one of the great directors, and called to this role as something I had to pursue for my spiritual development.”

A.O. Scott, now a chief film critic for The New York Times, once wrote that Scorsese approaches filmmaking as “a priestly avocation, a set of spiritual exercises embedded in technical problems.” So it was with “Silence.” “Marty insists on having silence on the set,” Garfield told me. “The silence says: ‘Something is happening here.’?” Scorsese arranged the shooting script chronologically, so the cast could feel the characters’ emotions in sequence. Finally Garfield reached the scene in which Rodrigues steps on the fumie, profaning the God he believes in and renouncing the faith he has come halfway across the world to preach. Actor and director prepared the shot: a bare foot pressed to a piece of copper, the face of Christ worn smooth by the feet of countless apostates before him. “It’s something we had both waited for,” Garfield said, “but Marty had waited much longer — he had waited decades to film that scene.” The director was ready; the priest stepped — and then there was a technical difficulty. “I almost lost my mind, and I think Marty did, too,” Garfield recalled. “He wanted it to be done in one take.” There was a second take, and the priest profaned the image of Christ once and for all.

Before it opens in New York and Los Angeles in December, Silence will be screened in Rome for several hundred Jesuits and for cinephiles at the Vatican.

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Categories Gallery Movie Projects Silence

“Silence” Promotional Stills & Poster

The first official poster for Silence and new promotional stills have been released and you can check in our gallery. Don’t forget: Silence opens on December 23rd.


Categories Movie Projects Silence

“Silence” First Trailer

The official trailer for Martin Scorsese’s new movie Silence, starring Andrew Garfield, has been released. Watch below:

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Andrew for Vogue December Issue

Andrew is on an article on Vogue December issue and we’ve got a new interview. Check out the picture featured and the article below.


Hanging up his Spider-Man spandex, Andrew Garf?eld reveals new depths playing heroic men of faith in Mel Gibson’s Hacksaw Ridge and Martin Scorsese’s Silence.

Behind the mask of every movie superhero you’ll find a serious actor yearning to peel it off. Although Andrew Garfield was a very good Spider-Man and Spider-Man was very good to him—making him world-famous and, as they say, bankable—the 33-year-old Londoner happily abandoned the red-and-blue spandex in search of something more satisfying. “There was something that made me go, I want to be training in a different way now,” he tells me over bites of curry at Café Gratitude in Venice, California. “I want to play at the feet of the masters.”

He got his wish, with starring roles in two of the holiday season’s most ambitious films. In Mel Gibson’s epic war movie Hacksaw Ridge, Garfield gives a stirring, bighearted turn as the real-life Desmond T. Doss, a country-boy Seventh-day Adventist who, though a committed pacifist and vegetarian, serves as an army medic during World War II. “He’s like Ferdinand the Bull, in that old Disney cartoon: The matador is trying to show him the red flag, and Ferdinand is just sniffing the flowers,” says Garfield. In Silence, Martin Scorsese’s meticulous adaptation of Shusaku Endo’s classic novel about Jesuit priests in a hostile seventeenth-century Japan, Garfield plays Father Sebastião Rodrigues, a Portuguese Jesuit who, along with a comrade (Adam Driver), faces torture, death, and a crisis of faith as they search for their missing mentor (Liam Neeson). It takes us back to a time when Catholic saints were, Garfield says, “the Kanye Wests of their day.”

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